Dawn Mander | Blackpool

Hello Dawn, thanks for submitting your work. Can you tell us a little bit about yourself ?
Not really much to tell, semi retired translator/interpretor with background in theatre and arts.

How did you first discover street photography?
Everyone starts out taking pictures of signs, and details, and sunsets. But not many people feel the need to take pictures of strangers.

What attracted you to it?
I find street photography exciting, I love people and people watching, imagining their lives and private stories. The behaviour and expressions of people on the streets excites me, draws me to the individuals.  I’ve been known to run up and down the streets to catch that moment , that special shot that makes me think ‘yes’ to myself… thinking ‘right that’s it now I can go home’ knowing that have captured that ‘thing’. But there are other times when I will find a spot and if the light is right will stand on a corner or sit on a step somewhere and wait,  watching daily life as it unfolds around me, sometimes am lucky and a story will come in to my line of view and I can capture that ‘attimo della vita’ that happens and is then gone…

You mainly document life in your hometown Blackpool. Can you tell us a little bit about the relation of the city and its people?
It's simple really I love my home town, not big enough to be a city but bigger than a small town its got something for everyone. Like many coastal towns it gets neglected when 'out of season' but its a great place with great characters for photography.

What drives you to pick up that camera day in and day out and hit the streets?
I think of street photography as a way of documenting history, capturing candid moments of subjects in everyday situations. I will leave the house with a destination in mind and go in search of the right light, once I get there will either go looking for a shot or simply wait till something or someone comes in to my frame and then, hoping that have the correct settings, will just press the shutter button capturing that moment in someone’s life when without knowing it they came in to mine.

Are you more of a walk and watch or a wait and see kind of street photographer?
There are times when I will find a spot and if the light is right will stand on a corner or sit on a step somewhere and wait,  watching daily life as it unfolds around me, sometimes am lucky and a story will come in to my line of view and I can capture that ‘attimo della vita’ that happens and is then gone…

How do you deal with confrontation when shooting on the street?
I frequently ask self "will this shot get me in trouble"? but I usually just risk in and come up with an on the spot explanation if questioned. A high viz jacket is always a good thing to have if going somewhere you shouldnt really be. Saying that I generally try to avoid being too noticeable using a Canon fd 28mm manual lens on my Lumix G2, also having the appearence of someone's (everyone's) grandmother helps!

How do you stay positive when you’re shooting on the street?
I get on the streets as often as I can and always feel positive when out shooting the unsuspecting public.

What advice would you give new street photographers that are stuck in a rut and can’t seem to move forward with their work?
Never compare yourself with others and don't copy other people's styles and images find something you like and practice till you're happy. Always look for something different.


If you had the chance to go on a photowalk with a famous street photographer. Who would it be and why?
William Eggleston - because I love his simplicity, the colours and the seeing something in the everyday.

Bruce Gilden & Dougie Wallace - because I admire their courage of using flash on the streets and Georgie Jerzyna Pauwels, a facebook photographer friend whose work have admired for many years.

Do you have a favorite photobook?
I have many and will carry on collecting ... I think mine will be my fave when I get round to printing it!!

Thanks for taking the time for the interview, Dawn. 
It was a pleasure!